Triggerfish|Saltwater Aquarium Trigger fish
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Triggerfish

Triggerfish are beautiful fish that are also very intelligent. Aquarist's love how triggerfish learn their feeder's and often show off for them by squirting water or a noise much like that of a pig grunting. Triggers are easily recognized by and named for their flexible trigger spines. Trigger fish have a flexible top dorsal spike that can be put into the up or down position at will. At the bottom of the body there is another smaller, permanently extended trigger that can be flexed as well. When they feel threatened, ready for sleep, or want to secure itself against a strong ocean surge or wave, the triggerfish will go into a hole and stick up its top trigger, flex the bottom trigger, and lock themselves into place.

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Aquarium Conditioned
Clown Triggerfish
Balistoides conspicillum
Picture of a Clown Triggerfish
Click for YouTube Video of the Clown Triggerfish

Description: The Clown triggerfish is an eye-catching species and the most popular trigger species. It is also as far as we know the only triggerfish that has been bred in home aquariums. It is readily available in fish stores and can be ordered online. It is however often quite expensive. It has a brown body and the lower half of it is covered in large white spots. The mouth is surrounded by a yellow field whit a white edge. On its back the Clown triggerfish has a yellow to gold colored field. The tailfin peduncle is sometimes, but not always, of the same yellow/gold color. My description does not make this fish justice and I recommend that you look at the pictures to get a better opinion of how this fish looks. They have a rather long lifespan and can grow to be over 10 years in aquariums and even older in the wild.

The Clown triggerfish is an aggressive fish that should never be kept with smaller fish or invertebrates. You can house it with other aggressive fish that are large enough to stand their ground against the Clown triggerfish. They are not reef safe and should not be kept in reef aquariums. They eat invertebrates and can damage or tip over corals when they try to rearrange the décor. The Clown triggerfish is a very hardy fish once they have acclimatize to an aquarium and started eating properly. They can be recommended to beginners that have a marine aquarium large enough to house them.The Clown triggerfish have sharp teeth and can bite if they feel threatened by you. Bites can be painful. The Clown triggerfish originates form the Indo Pacific Ocean and can be found from the African east coast down to Durban, South Africa and eastwards to Samoa. They can be found as far north as Southern Japan and as far south as New Caledonia.


Tank Recommendations: The Clown triggerfish is a large fish and they need to be housed in large aquariums. The minimum tank size for keeping a Clown triggerfish should be 100 gallons. As always when it comes to aquariums, bigger is better and an adult Clown triggerfish that can keep growing to beyond 18 inches will need an aquarium of at least 300 gallons. The Clown triggerfish prefers an aquarium that has a lot of caves and a few overhangs to explore, but also a lot of open space to swim in. It is important to provide it with a couple of suitably sized caves to sleep in. Make sure that the decoration is properly secured since this species likes to rearrange things and otherwise might cause accidents by causing rock formations to collapse. It also prefers a well lit well circulated aquarium with calmer shaded areas to rest in. They produce a lot of waste so good filtration is a must.

Food and diet: Clown triggerfish should be fed a varied diet consisting of many different types of meaty foods including: chopped shrimp, squid, clams or fish. It is also good to provide frozen foods that contain marine algae and are enhanced with vitamins and minerals. This species should be fed at least 3 times a day to provide it with adequate nutrition and to decrease its aggressiveness towards its tank-mates. Another helpful tip is to soak your fishes food in garlic as well. Especially when adding new fish and whenever your notice ich or other disease in the aquarium. Garlic helps repel external parasites, such as ich, and boosts immunity in all your fish.

Reef Compatability: Not suitable for a reef aquarium as it feeds on a wide-range of invertebrates.

Level of Care: Moderate

Approximate Purchase Size: Tiny up to 1" Small 1" to 2"; Small/Medium 2" to 3" Medium 3" to 4" Medium/Large 4" to 5" Large: 5" to 6" XLarge 6" to 7" XXLarge 7" to 8" Show 8" to 9"


Tiny $89.99 Small $99.99
Small/Medium $129.99 Medium $159.99
Medium/Large $179.99 Large $199.99
XLarge Australia$499.99
XXLarge Australia$899.99
Show Australia$1399.99


Aquarium Conditioned
Bluelined Triggerfish
Pseudobalistes fuscus
Picture of Bluelined Triggerfish,Pseudobalistes fuscus
YouTube Video of Beautiful Show Size Bluelined Triggerfish

Description: The Bluelined Trigger is highly sought after for its unique colouration and impressive adult size along with its ease of care when kept in a proper aquarium environment. Bluelined Triggers are a very hardy fish species that if kept in large aquarium with excellent mechanical and biological filtration will do very well in the aquarium environment. This species is also known for rearranging aquariums by blowing sand and substrate looking for invertebrates to eat and for undermining the foundations of rocks and coral.Bluelined Triggerfish begin life with very bright juvenile colours, which tend to fade a bit as they become adults. Juvenile specimens have a bright yellow or yellowish-tan body with bright blue lines all over its body, along with yellow markings on blue fins. As they grow the contrast between the yellow body and blue lines begins to lesson, and as mature adults they will have a tan body with less distinct blue markings throughout their body.

The Bluelined Triggerfish grows to as large as 22 inches in the wild. In the aquarium it will grow to a slightly smaller size. While juveniles may pick on newly introduced tank-mates or smaller fishes, larger specimens should only be housed with other large fish capable of holding their own with bold tankmates. Don't keep Blueline Triggerfish or most other larger triggers with small thin fish, as they will be eaten. This fish is often shy when initially introduced to the aquarium, hiding in preferred shelter site when you first enter the room. But, with time many specimens will begin to associate their caretaker with food, it will welcome your arrival and swim near the water's surface waiting for a tasty morsel. It is also notorious for rearranging the décor of the aquarium, and makes an interesting pet that can thrive for years in the aquarium.


Tank Recommendations: Blueline Triggerfish grow to over 22 inches in the wild and slightly smaller in the aquarium, therefore the recommended size for the aquarium is 300 gallons or larger. As always when it comes to aquariums, bigger is better and an adult Bluelined trigger will appreciate all the gallons you give it! Triggerfish prefer an aquarium that has a lot of caves and a few overhangs to explore, but also a lot of open space to swim in. It is important to provide it with a couple of suitably sized caves to sleep in. Make sure that the decoration is properly secured since this species likes to rearrange things and otherwise might cause accidents by causing rock formations to collapse. It also prefers a well lit well circulated aquarium with calmer shaded areas to rest in. They produce a lot of waste so good filtration is a must.

Food and diet: Bluelined Triggerfish should be fed a varied diet consisting of many different types of meaty foods including: chopped shrimp, squid, clams or fish. It is also good to provide frozen foods that contain marine algae and are enhanced with vitamins and minerals. This species should be fed at least 3 times a day to provide it with adequate nutrition and to decrease its aggressiveness towards its tank-mates. Another helpful tip is to soak your fishes food in garlic as well. Especially when adding new fish and whenever your notice ich or other disease in the aquarium. Garlic helps repel external parasites, such as ich, and boosts immunity in all your fish.

Level of Care: Moderate

Acclimaton Time: 2+ hours

Reef Compatibility: Not suitable for a reef aquarium as it feeds on a wide-range of invertebrates

Approximate Purchase Size: Small 1" to 2" Medium 2" to 3-1/2" Large 3-1/2" to 5" XLarge 5" to 7"

Tiny $69.99 Small $99.99
Small/Medium $129.99 Medium $159.99
Medium/Large $179.99 Large $199.99
XLarge $299.99

Aquarium Conditioned
Bursa Triggerfish
Rhinecanthus verrucosus
Picture of Bursa Triggerfish, Rhinecanthus verrucosus

Description: The Bursa Trigger fish is a beautiful and popular fish in the aquarium hobby. The fish has a yellow body with markings that make it look like a work of abstract art. This species is highly aggressive and will readily eat smaller fish. It should only be kept with other aggressive fish.In the wild, Bursa Trigger fish are most commonly found in shallow reef edge areas with sandy bottoms. They are found both in seaward and lagoon reef areas, where they feed on tunicates, mollusks, crustaceans, corals, fish, and sea urchins. As with all trigger fish, they are not reef safe. This is because they are destructive toward other fish and invertebrates in their aquariums.. Bursa Trigger fish are considered to be fairly hardy. They have strong teeth and jaws and may chew through items in their aquariums. Any inanimate object in the aquarium should be sturdy and well anchored. Often trigger fish will rearrange objects in the aquarium.

Tank Recommendations: Bursa Triggerfish grow to be 9 inches in the wild so we recommend housing in an aquarium of at least 125 gallons unless you plan to upsize later. As always when it comes to aquariums, bigger is better. Triggerfish prefer an aquarium that has a lot of caves and a few overhangs to explore, but also a lot of open space to swim in. It is important to provide it with a couple of suitably sized caves to sleep in. Make sure that the decoration is properly secured since this species likes to rearrange things and otherwise might cause accidents by causing rock formations to collapse. It also prefers a well lit well circulated aquarium with calmer shaded areas to rest in. They produce a lot of waste so good filtration is a must.

Food and diet: Triggerfish should be fed a varied diet consisting of many different types of meaty foods including: chopped shrimp, squid, clams or fish. It is also good to provide frozen foods that contain marine algae and are enhanced with vitamins and minerals. This species should be fed at least 3 times a day to provide it with adequate nutrition and to decrease its aggressiveness towards its tank-mates. Another helpful tip is to soak your fishes food in garlic as well. Especially when adding new fish and whenever your notice ich or other disease in the aquarium. Garlic helps repel external parasites, such as ich, and boosts immunity in all your fish.

Level of Care: Easy

Acclimaton Time: 2+ hours

Reef Compatibility: Not suitable for a reef aquarium as it feeds on a wide-range of invertebrates

Approximate Purchase Size: Small 1" to 2" Medium 2" to 3" Large 3" to 4"












Small $19.99 Medium $24.99
Large $39.99





Aquarium Conditioned
Niger Triggerfish
Odonus niger
Picture of Niger Triggerfish, Odonus niger
YouTube Video of Baby Niger Triggerfish

Description: The Niger trigger is the only trigger fish that can be kept in a reef aquarium. Originating in the Indo Pacific Ocea, they are found from the African east coast to Marquesas and Society islands. You can find them as far north as southern Japan and as far south as the Great Barrier Reef in Australia and New Caledonia. The Niger trigger fish aka Redtooth (ed) trigger fish is a popular aquarium fish and one of the few triggers that can be found in schools and that you can keep more than one of in the same aquarium. The Niger trigger fish will look a little different depending on mood. Usually the Niger trigger has a completely blue body. The further back on the body you look the softer blue it becomes. This fish can however sometimes display green color as well. The edges of the fins are bright blue. When they fish get excited, it can vocalize a grunting sound. An interesting fact about the Niger trigger is that they are not aggressive towards other fish and they are even tolerant towards other Niger trigger fish. Therefore if you like Niger's, you definitely can keep several in the same aquarium. They can be kept in community aquariums or reef aquariums with any other fish and they will be fine..

Tank Recommendations: Niger Triggerfish grow to be 12 inches in the wild, slightly smaller in the aquarium, so we recommend housing in an aquarium of at least 180 gallons unless you plan to upsize later. As always when it comes to aquariums, bigger is better. Triggerfish prefer an aquarium that has a lot of caves and a few overhangs to explore, but also a lot of open space to swim in. It is important to provide it with a couple of suitably sized caves to sleep in. Make sure that the decoration is properly secured since this species likes to rearrange things and otherwise might cause accidents by causing rock formations to collapse. It also prefers a well lit well circulated aquarium with calmer shaded areas to rest in. They produce a lot of waste so good filtration is a must.

Food and diet: Triggerfish should be fed a varied diet consisting of many different types of meaty foods including: chopped shrimp, squid, clams or fish. It is also good to provide frozen foods that contain marine algae and are enhanced with vitamins and minerals. This species should be fed at least 3 times a day to provide it with adequate nutrition and to decrease its aggressiveness towards its tank-mates. Another helpful tip is to soak your fishes food in garlic as well. Especially when adding new fish and whenever your notice ich or other disease in the aquarium. Garlic helps repel external parasites, such as ich, and boosts immunity in all your fish.

Level of Care: Easy

Acclimaton Time: 2+ hours

Reef Compatibility: Not suitable for a reef aquarium as it feeds on a wide-range of invertebrates

Approximate Purchase Size: Small 1" to 2" Medium 2" to 3" Medium/Large 3" to 4" Large 4" to 5" XLarge 5" to 7"












Small $24.99 Medium $36.99
Medium/Large $69.99
Large $99.99 XLarge $199.99





Aquarium Conditioned
Huma Picasso Triggerfish
Rhinecanthus aculeatus
Picture of Huma Picasso Triggerfish, Rhinecanthus aculeatus
YouTube Video of Huma Huma Triggerfish

Description: The Picasso triggerfish is also called the Huma Huma Trigger, or Huma Picasso Triggerfish. It is a very beautiful fish that truly deserves the popularity it has gained. The Picasso triggerfish is less aggressive than most other triggerfish but that doesn't mean that it isn't aggressive. It can be kept in community aquariums with other aggressive fish species. It should never be kept with small species as it will likely eat them. Only keep one Picasso triggerfish in the aquarium.The Picasso triggerfish is like most triggers a hardy species and if it weren't for its size and temperament it would be an ideal beginner fish. Picasso triggerfish can be recommended to beginners that have a large enough aquarium and don't mind the fact that it is aggressive and only can be kept with other large aggressive species. The Picasso triggerfish have a very large native range and can be found in the Indian Ocean, the Pacific Ocean and the Atlantic. In the Atlantic, it can be found along the west coast of Africa from Senegal to South Africa. In the Indo Pacific Ocean they can be found from the east coast of Africa to the Hawaiian, Marquesan, and Tuamoto islands. The northern distribution limit is the coast of southern Japan and the southern limit is Lord Howe Island.

Tank Recommendations: Huma Huma Triggerfish grow to be 11 inches in the wild, slightly smaller in the aquarium, so we recommend housing in an aquarium of at least 180 gallons unless you plan to upsize later. As always when it comes to aquariums, bigger is better. Triggerfish prefer an aquarium that has a lot of caves and a few overhangs to explore, but also a lot of open space to swim in. It is important to provide it with a couple of suitably sized caves to sleep in. Make sure that the decoration is properly secured since this species likes to rearrange things and otherwise might cause accidents by causing rock formations to collapse. It also prefers a well lit well circulated aquarium with calmer shaded areas to rest in. They produce a lot of waste so good filtration is a must.

Food and diet: Triggerfish should be fed a varied diet consisting of many different types of meaty foods including: chopped shrimp, squid, clams or fish. It is also good to provide frozen foods that contain marine algae and are enhanced with vitamins and minerals. This species should be fed at least 3 times a day to provide it with adequate nutrition and to decrease its aggressiveness towards its tank-mates. Another helpful tip is to soak your fishes food in garlic as well. Especially when adding new fish and whenever your notice ich or other disease in the aquarium. Garlic helps repel external parasites, such as ich, and boosts immunity in all your fish.

Level of Care: Easy

Acclimaton Time: 2+ hours

Reef Compatibility: Not suitable for a reef aquarium as it feeds on a wide-range of invertebrates

Approximate Purchase Size: Small 1" to 2" Medium 2" to 3" Medium/Large 3" to 3-3/4" Large 3-3/4" to 4-1/2" XLarge 4-1/2" to 6"












Small $29.99 Medium $39.99
Medium/Large $59.99
Large $79.99 XLarge $119.99





Aquarium Conditioned
Blue Throat Triggerfish
Xanthicthys auromarginatus
Picture of Blue Throat Triggerfish, Xanthicthys auromarginatus
YouTube Video of 6" Blue Throat Triggerfish

Description: Blue Throats are one of the best, if not the best, triggerfish for marine aquariums. This is a fish that a reputation for being quite shy when first introduced to the aquarium, but is also a fish that will come to learn your patterns and recognize who is the "feeder". They will spit water out at you when waiting for the meaty foods and be very engaged in everything you do around the aquarium. They grow slowly to a maximum size that isn't very large. They are a very hardy fish that is one of the least aggressive fish in the family. They are easily paired (or added in harems) and have been known to spawn in captivity. Also called the Gilded Triggerfish because of the golden fin rims displayed by mature males. Females lack this colouration as well as the distinctive blue throat or jaw. The Xanthichthys auromarginatus in the wild can reach as large as 11 inches long, but in the aquarium they seem to reach between 9 and 10 inches max. X. auromarginatus range throughout the tropical Indian and western Pacific Oceans; generally in areas of consistent current with heavy invertebrate presence. They can be found from very shallow water down to nearly 500 feet of depth, but a much more common depth is from 50 to 150 feet. They are frequently found in loose "schools" just above the bottom where they eat mostly small planktonic foods like copepods.
Tank Recommendations: Blue Throat Triggerfish grow to be between 9 and 10 inches in the aquarium, so we recommend housing in an aquarium of at least 125 gallons unless you plan to upsize later. As always when it comes to aquariums, bigger is better. They like to swim and thus need an aquarium with some swimming space, but even more importantly, they relish having strong current to exercise in. Because this is such an active fish, it should be fed at least 2x per day. Luckily, this is a fish that will generally take palletized foods fairly quickly, so aquarium keepers can use auto feeders for one or more of these feeding's. That being said, it is still important to get this fish meaty meals regularly. Triggerfish prefer an aquarium that has a lot of caves and a few overhangs to explore, but also a lot of open space to swim in. It is important to provide it with a couple of suitably sized caves to sleep in. Make sure that the decoration is properly secured since this species likes to rearrange things and otherwise might cause accidents by causing rock formations to collapse. It also prefers a well lit well circulated aquarium with calmer shaded areas to rest in. They produce a lot of waste so good filtration is a must.
Food and diet: Triggerfish should be fed a varied diet consisting of many different types of meaty foods including: chopped shrimp, squid, clams or fish. It is also good to provide frozen foods that contain marine algae and are enhanced with vitamins and minerals. This species should be fed at least 3 times a day to provide it with adequate nutrition and to decrease its aggressiveness towards its tank-mates. Another helpful tip is to soak your fishes food in garlic as well. Especially when adding new fish and whenever your notice ich or other disease in the aquarium. Garlic helps repel external parasites, such as ich, and boosts immunity in all your fish.

Level of Care: Easy
Acclimaton Time: 2+ hours
Reef Compatibility: With Caution
Approximate Purchase Size:
Female: Medium 2" to 3" Large 3" - 4" Xlarge 4" to 5"
Male: Medium 3" to 4" Large 4" to 5" XLarge 5" to 6"


Female: Medium $99.99 Large $129.99
Female: XLarge $169.99

Male: Medium $119.99 Large $149.99
Male: XLarge $229.99


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Copyright 2018 Aquarium Creations Online
Photos are representative of each species. All marine life will be unique and variations should be expected, color and sizes may vary.
*Guarantee Restriction: All of our livestock are guaranteed. However for one or more of these species, they may be marked with a guarantee restriction. If it does, it means the specific animal may not handle stress from environmental conditions well. These stresses can include poor water quality, harassment from tank mates or confined aquarium conditions. When stressed, these species can lose the ability to ward off infection and disease. Other species may be listed as Restricted because they have such specialized feeding requirements that is difficult recreate in a aquarium and may succumb to malnutrition.